1970's Yé-yé punk pop? An old genre's new sub-genre? Even in this, the heyday of music categorizing snobbery that seems to delight fans, bloggers, and YouTube commenters round the globe, The Better Letters aren't that easy to classify. So fall back for five minutes and...

Other Electricities is from Miami, FL. Initially, we launched in Portland, OR in 2006 and before we knew it, we'd traveled around the world in a sense -- releasing sounds from international artists. Since we never stuck to one genre over another, our artists not only span the globe but span sonic styles and approaches. Thanks to Vivian Hua and Redefine Magazine for doing what they do and supporting us from the very beginning. We hope there's a little something for everyone in this mixtape. Many thanks to Tom & Tiffany Dorsey, Jet, Aaron Powers, the Sweat Records crew, Carl Saff, Jeff Brunetto, Patrick Ethridge, Jules, Kristin Bradshaw, Sabrina Heath, Matt Phillips, Laura Becker and everyone else who's been a part of O.E. in some way. Curated by Emile Milgrim, Owner and Co-Founder of Other Electricities

Born With Stripes is a chameleon of an album. It starts off with a catchy, pop -- "accessible indie," as I like to call it -- number, entitled "We Don't Know Who We Are." This album has so many varied styles (from blues to psychedelic to Indian-influenced) that I don't think this album quite knows who it is; but that's okay.

This first track and its two subsequent tracks have been on consistent rotation in my brain since I first listened to this disc. Track two, "I Like The Way You Walk," is a very inviting tune, and it does associate well with "We Don't Know Who We Are"; these two songs are from the same family, as it were. However, track three, "Bloodhound," enters the scene and all bets are off. This is the stone cold blues track of Born With Stripes. It is easily my vote for best track on the entire album. With lines like, "I'll need a bloodhound just to track her down, but she'll be mine again," and carefully-placed background "oooo-oooo"'s, it is difficult not to love this song. But that's the genius of blues; it is a stereotypically cool genre of music (and what a nice stereotype to have!).

The "West Coast Raga" and later "East Coast Raga" would fit in well as B-Sides to The Beatles' 1966 classic Revolver, with their sitar sounds, spiraling guitar lines, and hypnotic basslines and drum beats. These tracks stick out and clash with the other tracks until about halfway through these songs, when the listener gets enveloped by them; and, at that point, it is all aural gravy. A friend overheard me listening to "Bullfrog Blues" and said it could very easily be a lost Lovin' Spoonful track. On that note, I feel that "New Blue Stockings" has a Doors-y or Jefferson Airplane-y motif to it. So, the '60s are represented very well in this disc.

Is Tropical blends old school cartoon and video game with real life in this video where boys will be boys. The headshots are okay because it's animated violence, kids, and fake chemistry sets with briefcases full of money and boxes labeled with "drogue" are just...

Take an emaciated lady in the Kate Moss realm of beauty and make her lipsync to Tom Vek's "A Chore," and the casting and execution are so appealing that this entire video feels strangely and androgynously natural. ...

With extreme macro shots of eyes, mouths, and other indistinguishable slimy body parts, this video for "Beard" leaves one scratching one's head just as Colourmusic's style of indie psych-sludge mash-up leaves you scratching your head. ...

Strangely, I am most fascinated by the slight patterning to be found on this video for Architecture In Helsinki's "Escapee." Other than that, not much happens; the video's appeal lies in the fact that it is shot like a dreary Nordic drama, and it's more...