"Summer Of Love" is one of the most compelling tracks on Prince Rama's latest album, Trust Now, and this new music video feels revelatory, an Indian and Hare Krishna-inspired celebration of glitz and glamour. Crafted completely by Prince Rama and with the help of close friends, this video begins slowly...

Chilean filmmakerAlejandro Jodorowsky's Holy Mountain was released in 1973. The psychedelic story is geometry-heavy and laden with symbolic imagery and metaphysical themes. In short, the visually-stunning masterpiece has inspired countless creations, and it seems to be receiving another breath of fresh air as of late. REDEFINE MUSICIANS, ARTISTS, AND FILMMAKERS...

Storm Thorgerson is eternally taking photography to next levels. While doing research today for his recent cover of the Wombats' This Modern Glitch (see below), I came across this lovely project he is doing for Dark Side Of The Moon. The name of the game is controlled randomness! Chaos in the...

I've oft wondered how radically different our music culture would be if say, venues were allowed to turn a profit from other drugs. Thanks to John Hopkins University, we're now for the first time since the '60s seeing studies which suggest psilocybin can be used for all kinds of freaky deaky shit -- like say, alleviating people's fear of death. I personally use them to peer into the intricate depths of the thousand-eyed hive mind, but to each their own. Am I the only one who's beyond weirded out by the fact that there's only one legal recreational drug? It's shamelessly pushed down our throats, and what does it do? It binds us here and keeps us stupid; that's what it does. It's called mind control my friends, pure and simple. You can drink booze! It's all over the fucking place. There are literally billions of potential recreational compounds which we could choose as the foundation for our cultural activities, and that's the one we get. You've got to stop thinking this makes any sense. I've always joked that if you want to get paid playing music, you should start a cover band. The reason is simple: the game's been rigged. Clubs make their money off booze and drunk people want to hear songs they already know and can sing along with. Hell, I do when I'm drunk. Timeless states of being are always within our reach through the use of psychoactive substances, meditation, breathing exercises, dream manipulation, and other natural methods -- but it's also nice to know that Midday Veil frontwoman Emily Pothast's fledgling record label, Translinguistic Other, is on the forefront of helping you achieve them with even greater ease through sonic invocation. I caught up with the prolific Miss Pothast (pronounced like “hottest") to discuss some of these topics, and some other stuff that happened to be going through my head when I drew up the questions. I was kind of drunk.

Q&A With Emily Pothast, Translinguistic Other Founder & Midday Veil Vocalist

I first became interested in Gnosticism when I was living in a part of Texas that is completely dominated by fundamentalist Christianity. I knew the dominant culture was fucked, but I didn’t feel like it was useful to be completely dismissive of the religious mythologies that held so much resonance for these people. I wanted to know where these ideas came from and to see if I could learn something about the patterns behind them. -- Emily Pothast, on mysticism

Starfucker works with Joshua Cox on this beauty, taking kaleidoscopic imagery generally manifested through digital means and turning it on an analog head. In what must have been a high-budget, laboriously-planned effort, this video for "Bury Us Alive" sees the appearance of clever special effects and earthy costumes. The team...

Godammit! Yet another kick-ass video from the ever-so-artistically-minded Mastodon. The original cover, which features the 3-dimensional wood-sculptured artwork of Portland-based artist AJ Fosik, is chopped up, mirrored many times over, and shot into outerspace. Expect our interview with AJ Fosik soon! As for the track itself, Scott Kelly of Neurosis offers...

September 15th, 2011 - Branx, Portland, OR Suuns -- which, for the confused, and for me prior to MusicFestNW is pronounced "soons" -- play exactly the kind of dark dancey art rock that works for me. The Montreal band's ability to bridge pop and dance elements with seemingly contrasting elements...