When it comes to pop music, bands can try to "defy convention" in a myriad of ways. Some reach for far off musical influences, seeking to add some contrived spice to their normally pedestrian songwriting. Some try to create jarring textures that say to the listener, "Hey! I really hate...

A journey to the sea sometimes is a ritual -- an escape from the responsibilities and tribulations that lurk around every corner in the big cities. For school kids, a trip to the sea is almost a requirement for the perfect summer vacation. For a family, a picnic by the...

They say when you're hurting the deepest, it helps to drown yourself in the things you love. For some it might be in food and drink; for others, in the love of family and friends. But no post-separation binge has ever borne such interesting fruit as Nina Paley's animated feature,...

What do you get when you put two overwhelmed magazine staffers, a few hundred bands, a shit ton of industry people, and a gay horse all together? You get Redefine Magazine's first SxSW adventure! And though the weekend was a hot sweaty blur at best, we're reminiscing about the best, worst, and craziest parts of the whole shebang (at least the parts we got into -- fuck you, Rachel Ray).
 

Cadence Weapon

Saturday morning at the Mohawk bar, I caught Edmonton-grown hip hopster Cadence Weapon. It wasn't the largest crowd I had seen, but I'd bet the overbearing heat had much to do with that. In fact, the heat didn't make it very easy for Mr. Rollie Pemberton; his mixer broke down midway through the set due to overheating. Temperatures were blazing and Mr. Pemberton was obviously a little worse for wear (most likely from partying it up with fellow Edmontonions from Shout Out Out Out Out), but the man truly rocked the house, whether it was screaming his lungs out for “In Search of the Youth Crew" or charging up the crowd with “Real Estate." I can't help but marvel at the enthusiasm of the crowd -- one of the many trademarks of SxSW as a whole.  

Darondo

Passing by the outdoor lot on Red River Road, I saw a name that I never expected to see at any music festival, much less SxSW. Soul survivor Darondo was performing in the hot Austin sun, and his charismatic banter and incorrigible voice was a welcome refresher from the boys-with-guitars that I had been seeing up until then. Though it was obviously being framed as a mom and pop type event, Darondo brought smiles to everyone in the crowd -- young and old. Nothing really beats sucking on a free popsicle in the 90 degree heat while hearing Darondo talk about his mad cache of bitches.  

"3:10 to Yuma," a remake of the 1957 film of the same name, is the first of a few western themed movies to hit screens this fall. Its premise is simple: Christian Bale, playing downtrodden war veteran turned rancher Dan Evans, volunteers to help escort the devious outlaw Ben Wade,...

At first glance, Paprika is a stylish sci-fi detective thriller that uses dreams as a reason to explore the limits of animation. The visuals are exhilarating and titillating based on any level of criteria. But while many would be quick to write this film off as another "beautiful but brainless"...

New Zealand 2007, 93 minutes It’s impossible to talk about Eagle vs Shark, a low budget comedy about weirdos in love, without talking about Napoleon Dynamite, a low budget comedy about weirdos coming of age. Taika Waititi's latest movie borrows so much from the 2004 hit comedy that it never truly...

USA 2007, 98 minutes, 35mm Hal Hefner, our teenage hero in Rocket Science, is the stuttering kid. He stammers through simple sentences. He looks at his feet while he talks to people. He sits in the back of class, fearful that his voice might accidentally escape and run away. And for...

Phillippines, 2006, 35mm, Tagalog (with subtitles) Jeffrey Jeturian’s film revolves around luck. Amy, a middle-aged woman who endlessly roams the winding streets of her Manila neighborhood relies entirely on it. Searching for people to place bets on jueteng, a popular gambling game in the Philippines, her livelihood is based on chance....

Hong Kong/China, 2006, 131 minutes, 35mm Mandarin Chinese (with English subtitles) Why do the Chinese like to title their movies The Banquet so often? A quick search on IMDB pulled up three entries...