"I had a big manifesto of 'no's' at the beginning, [of things] that I didn't want to do." As a composer, violinist, and multi-instrumentalist, Christopher Tignor has, since the early '00s, led the New York City-based instrumental groups Slow Six and Wires.Under.Tension. Up until recently, however, he'd had little interest in...

Though such a struggle may have only existed in some people's minds, if there was one between digital and analog music recording and creation, there's no question that digital came out on top without ever even having to dig a trench. Does this make any remaining pockets of resistance akin...

“Language is the quintessential blueprint that can bridge between the senses. The more I attempt to describe music in visual terms, and the visual in musical terms, the more I’m training toward synesthesia. It’s not an ability that I naturally have, but I’ve developed it through language. It constantly informs...

"Some boys began to drink beer and whiskey, a few began to smoke marijuana" -- so says a voice seemingly beamed in from a middle twentieth century nature documentary on the partying habits of young men. It's an interesting sample, but perhaps a bit misleading. "A Few Began to Smoke",...

Side projects: so many musicians these days seem to have at least one other creative outlet outside their primary endeavor. Whether it's for reasons of inspiration, camaraderie, money, a need to stay busy, or any combination thereof, keeping a couple irons in the fire seems to be the thing to...

Not only did Italian producer Pietro Iannuzzi name Indian Wells after the Californian city that hosts the BNP Paribas Open (formerly known as the Indian Wells Masters), but the release date of his new album, Pause, was timed to match up with the first day of this year's tournament. This isn't the first time Iannuzzi has made such overt thematic connections with this project; tennis references were equally clear on Indian Wells' 2012 debut, Night Drops. For one, a picture of a tennis court at night was used as that album's cover image. For another, the first track on Night Drops was called "Wimbledon 1980", and is built on samples of the sound of tennis balls being whacked back and forth. Midway through the song, the sample's novelty diminishes as it becomes absorbed completely into the track. It might have been overkill if it hadn't worked so well.
Indian Wells - Pause Album Review

"It’s kind of fun to have this open-ended series… It’s really just the psychological triggers that you do with yourself. No one is actually imposing restrictions or boundaries on you, but at times, you feel like you have a place, a repository to fit these other ideas, that doesn’t lose...

In a universe consisting of four percent matter and ninety-six percent negative space, absence is the dominant substance. With the right frame of mind, a void can be an endless possibility. Disappears' fifth album pounds that clay into a sonic metaphor. Gloom is one thing, but seeing darkness -- an...

Pour Le Plaisir
Pour le Plaisir has been producing, remixing, and collaborating since as far back as 2001. Having released over one dozen records on the French dance label Moleskine, this is his first with the UK’s Blue Tapes and X-Ray Records, a recently revamped tandem tape and vinyl series who have also recently reissued on vinyl Blue Twelve, improvisational guitarist Tashi Dorji’s album from last year. Citing his hometown to be both as France and Italy, Pour le Plaisir (real name only provided as Patrick G., retaining a slight elusiveness to his identity) does seem comfortable in migration on the Tin Machine EP. While not as directionally opposed as the cardinal points, each of the four tracks on Tin Machine presents a competing impulse. Winding up and down and back up again, the humid, textural opening title track rolls insistently but unhurried. "The Movie", perhaps a little too naturally titled, then comes out of seemingly nowhere and grabs you by the hand, pulling you out into an anxious, rain-slicked and poorly lit streetscape straight out of bad-old-days-era New York City cinema. You can almost hear a panicked voice demand, "Where are you taking me?!"