Neill Cameron illustrates and alliterates his way from A to Z with his series, The A-Z Of Awesomeness. All of them feature zaniness and popular comic book or pop culture references. A couple of my favorites are below; please visit his website to see the...

I'm tired of boutique card decks that are too lazy to make custom cards for every card and instead only give a little bit of love to face cards. The Black Rock Collective's new card deck gives artsy fartsy equal-opportunity treatment, creating super slick cards...

UK collective Peepshow have re-done their website, and in honor of it, we're going to feature a piece of work for each of their members. Hoorah!  The Beginning of the End for Illustrative '09, by Luke Best Barefootin' for Howies, by Jenny Bowers. After The Storm for The...

I put Portugal. the Man's new album as one of my outside favorites. The Satanic Satanist is a brilliant soul-influenced album that really shows the Portland band is coming into its own. This is the absolutely bizarre video for the track "Do You"...

 
With the release of their self-titled album in 2007, HEALTH, clad in tight jeans and neon t-shirts, solidified their place amongst hipsters and teens. But while the group quickly appealed to these demographics, they had alienated themselves from the mainstream, written off by many as musicians more concerned with style than music. Two years later, their new album, Get Color, exemplifies their newfound maturity as songwriters and renders them whole conceptually. Whereas HEALTH went completely over the heads of mainstream audiences, Get Color is a bit more accessible to the layperson. Its tracks are more discernible as songs, and for the most part, they are no longer just noise, proving that HEALTH are more than a group with just a distinct fashion sense. While still experimental, the songs now harbor more melodies and qualities found in traditional songwriting.
"I think we just got better at writing our songs," says bassist John Famiglietti. "We don't want you to only like [our music] because you're supposed to like it or you like it because it's cool. I don't want you to scratch your fucking head. It should be immediate... I think [the new album] just makes our music more effective." To drive this message home, the quartet recently come off a tour supporting Nine Inch Nails, and despite getting pretzels thrown at them in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and an equally terrible show in Jacksonville, Florida, Famiglietti has only great things to say about the experience. "Trent is just about the coolest dude there is, especially for being someone who's like pretty openly worshiped by all people coming to the show," reveals Famiglietti. "After [our] first show, Trent was like, 'Hey, I don't even know what the hell's going on up there... why don't you guys use all the screens behind you?' We used literally several multi-million dollar LED screens which were like 20 feet high, and infrared cameras were put on all of us... our shows went way better after we had this gigantic light show." BAND INTERVIEW CONTINUED BELOW

Just sharing some jolly good locally-grown experimental psych-pop with you, courtesy of Big Spider's Back and director Karla Santos. The video for "Warped" captures psychedelic pop in its essence, really, with radiant colors swirling in and out of consciousness, melding with shapes and figures reminiscent...

All bands -- or at least the good ones -- have an album that, in future years, will be judged as the pinnacle of their successes. Some start out strong but never achieve much recognition with their first and second albums. Some build up to a grand finale but crumble right as their greatest album is released. Some are so consistent, with each new album being a fitting reinvention of their sound, that the debate will rage on for years as to which album defines their legacy. Such is the case with Portugal. The Man, whose fanbase is constantly at odds with itself over which album is the band's most important release to date. With their fourth disc, The Satanic Satanist, the debate continues to rage on. From its fantastically elaborate album packaging to its upgrade in record production quality, The Satanic Satanist marks a definitive, significant change in Portugal. The Man's career; it solidly extends the band's sphere of influence into pop, folk, and funk territories.
Listen to "People Say" - DOWNLOAD MP3

HEALTH's Get Color Record Release Show September 11th, 2009 @ The Troubadour - Los Angeles, CA
HEALTH's record release show for their newest disc, Get Color, marked my first time inside Doug Weston's legendary venue, The Troubadour. Once inside, I instantly understood why it has become such a historical part of Los Angeles; the venue is spacious yet still intimate, and the upstairs area is perfect for a relaxed bird's-eye view of the stage.
 

Collaborations, collaborations, collaborations. They sometimes get tired and predictable, but when they're done correctly, as Kate Cleaves and Matt W. Moore have done with their show, Convergence, they can be exquisite. Toss in one part geometric works of Moore and one part soft organic form of...