An imposing wall of rotary dials, turreted by oscilloscopes, draped in spaghettied cables, emitting a series of creaks, groans, and unearthly bubbles, is one of the most iconic images of electronic music. These monolithic machines -- known as modular synthesizers -- have had an enormous impact on how we visualize...

Spectral Hypnosis is a recurring series, featuring mesmerizing songs for one to lose sense of time and space, mind and body.
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Factory Floor - "How Do You Say"

The music video for Factory Floor's "How Do You Say" is really nothing more than monotonous vocals, Nik Void's bouncing hair, and geometric projections upon an empty wall -- but this, in essence, is Factory Floor. Having just caught them on their national tour, I will say that this is techno for those who don't really feel the need to go anywhere over the course of a song or even a half-hour set, because when jogging in place looks and feels like this, it's somewhat enthralling enough. Directed by Factory Floor's Nik Void and Dan Tombs themselves. Releases are spread on two digital EPs and three physical 12 EPs, to be released throughout the month of April, featuring the original as well as a number of remixes; hear Daniel Avery and Helena Hauff's below.    
Remix City Sifting through mountains of remix trash so you don't have to, in an attempt to find the ones that contribute to their originals. Today's installment goes industrial! Einstürzende Neubauten's Alexander Hacke works his magic on San Francisco's Tussle, U.K. post-industrial outfit Factory Floor turn Australia's My Disco into a hardly recognizable form, and the post ends with a throwback to the brutality of Einstürzende Neubauten themselves, as remixed by Adrian Sherwood.
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Tussle

San Francisco's groovy electronic act Tussle will be releasing their fourth album, Tempest, on September 25th via Smalltown Supersound! "Eye Context" is the first single from the album, now followed by a remix of "Yume No Mori" by Einstürzende Neubauten's Alexander Hacke, who did a fantastic job working far out electronics in with brutal percussion and funky basslines.