In reviews for Kikagaku Moyo's House in the Tall Grass, some have implied that the Japanese psych folk up-and-comers are simply rehashing old ground. Consider a sentence from Danny Riley of The Quietus, who writes, "The problem comes when artists fail to recognize the elements of their chosen influence that have...

You can't go home again, as the old saying goes -- similar in sentiment to, "You can't step in the same river twice." Life is constantly flowing, shifting, changing shape. Sure, you can go to the building where you were raised. You can revisit your parents, extended family, old friends,...

Portland has been changing a lot in the last decade, much to the chagrin of both long-term residents and more freshly minted transplants, who've coasted in on the myth of Portland as "the place where people in their 20s go to retire." While message boards may be flooded with complaints...

Maybe it was the fact that CMJ Music Marathon 2015 took place a week earlier this year than last year, but the music industry marathon's 35th anniversary felt a bit more expansive than the 2014 edition -- as if it were a day longer, though it wasn't. Perhaps it had...

José González's music has always maintained a timeless quality. In the realm of contemporary folk, there is no competition for his soothing yet soulful tones and melodic, plucking guitar. On Vestiges & Claws, the first solo album he's released in 7 years, a new kind of electrifying energy is at play. Melding the intimately personal with the overwhelming impersonal, González takes us on a journey with him, creating the kind of depth that elevates a folk album from pleasant background music to a collection that will stay and grow with you -- as it has evidently stayed and grown with him -- for a long time.
Jose Gonzalez - Vestiges And Claws Album Review  
Every record is an island. An artist's statements shouldn't always be judged on trends, the label they're on, or what other people are doing. Perhaps they shouldn't even be judged against that artist's own work. It's all too common in the current state of music journalism or criticism to hear, "This isn't as good as their old stuff," or as whatever the landmark release is in that genre. Just look at how every shoegaze record has been measured again My Bloody Valentine's Loveless. Still, when a label releases two records on the same day, it's hard not to read into it, or at least wonder if there's some grand vision at work. Especially when that label is Sacred Bones, who are known for collecting skinny post-punk, black tie new wave, tar-dipped goth rock, excoriating noise, and many, many shades of psychedelia under their eye-catching triangle in the circle marker. On November 11th, Sacred Bones released two widely dissimilar records: the motorik futurism of Dream Police's Hypnotized, and the apocalyptic folk goth opera Final Days, from the mysterious Cult Of Youth.

Dream Police - Hypnotized

Dream Police

Cult of Youth - Final Days

Cult of Youth