It's nice when you're a small band being taken out by a large band and given the opportunity to use the large band's ace visual equipment (see: HEALTH talking about Trent Reznor). Well, same deal applies to Portlanders Morning Teleportation, who are now on tour...

Anvil Anvil Aterciopelados Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes The Redwood Plan The Whigs Fences Feral Children HEALTH HEALTH Hole Meat Puppets Meat Puppets THEEsatisfaction Ω...

I've fairly recently read a book about the hidden sexuality of Little Red Riding Hood through its surprisingly numerous and varied iterations. I don't know if this video has anything to do with the themes of that book, but it seems to. It's bloody. It's...

 
With the release of their self-titled album in 2007, HEALTH, clad in tight jeans and neon t-shirts, solidified their place amongst hipsters and teens. But while the group quickly appealed to these demographics, they had alienated themselves from the mainstream, written off by many as musicians more concerned with style than music. Two years later, their new album, Get Color, exemplifies their newfound maturity as songwriters and renders them whole conceptually. Whereas HEALTH went completely over the heads of mainstream audiences, Get Color is a bit more accessible to the layperson. Its tracks are more discernible as songs, and for the most part, they are no longer just noise, proving that HEALTH are more than a group with just a distinct fashion sense. While still experimental, the songs now harbor more melodies and qualities found in traditional songwriting.
"I think we just got better at writing our songs," says bassist John Famiglietti. "We don't want you to only like [our music] because you're supposed to like it or you like it because it's cool. I don't want you to scratch your fucking head. It should be immediate... I think [the new album] just makes our music more effective." To drive this message home, the quartet recently come off a tour supporting Nine Inch Nails, and despite getting pretzels thrown at them in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and an equally terrible show in Jacksonville, Florida, Famiglietti has only great things to say about the experience. "Trent is just about the coolest dude there is, especially for being someone who's like pretty openly worshiped by all people coming to the show," reveals Famiglietti. "After [our] first show, Trent was like, 'Hey, I don't even know what the hell's going on up there... why don't you guys use all the screens behind you?' We used literally several multi-million dollar LED screens which were like 20 feet high, and infrared cameras were put on all of us... our shows went way better after we had this gigantic light show." BAND INTERVIEW CONTINUED BELOW

HEALTH's Get Color Record Release Show September 11th, 2009 @ The Troubadour - Los Angeles, CA
HEALTH's record release show for their newest disc, Get Color, marked my first time inside Doug Weston's legendary venue, The Troubadour. Once inside, I instantly understood why it has become such a historical part of Los Angeles; the venue is spacious yet still intimate, and the upstairs area is perfect for a relaxed bird's-eye view of the stage.
 

Last year marked the first year in which we compiled a top five albums of the year, as deemed by nine Redefine staff writers. Remarkably, no albums were doubled up. It proved that Redefine staff writers have diverse tastes, and that their tastes run the...

This year was the first year that any Redefine staff members have managed to make it down to SxSW in Austin. We didn't know what to expect since SxSW's reputation proceeds it. Although slightly daunting and involving way too much standing around, SxSW is one amazing event. Some people are mistaken in thinking that SxSW is yet another cramped, sweaty festival in which people are herded around like derelict cattle. It is much, much more than that. SxSW is a non-stop music party in the city of Austin. Every venue in town -- including bars and churches that are not usually venues -- begin churning out bands from noon to early the next morning. People from all over the country and world come to Austin in mid-March to experience all of the musical delights -- free and paid -- that SxSW has to offer. Because of diverse booking, music lovers can see anyone as laughable as Bo Bice or Hanson to anyone as underground as that shitty nobody who plays at your local coffee shop. SxSW is, in many ways, an independent music lover's dream, as there were very few major label artists being represented. And did I mention the free food? Oh yes, there was a lot of free food and schwag as well. This year, we went from late Thursday, March 13th to early Sunday, March 16th. Because of the sheer number of bands at SxSW, the long lines during the nighttime shows, and the cruelty of Father Time, we obviously didn't see every band. Nonetheless, here are my five favorite acts from SxSW, in no particular order, along with a couple notable mentions.