Directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson Sound Of Noise is labeled as a black humor and oddball action film, which it is. More than anything, though, it is a music film – one which celebrates and pays homage to experimental music, as well as avant-garde classical composers. From the hand-drawn opening credits of Sound Of Noise, I knew there would be something punk rock about this film, and there certainly is. A pair of misfits -- a music school dropout and a stoic songwriter -- enlist four percussionists to join them for a four-movement composition entitled Music For One City And Six Drummers. Executed in true anarchist fashion, the movements take on the form of musical flash mobs, performed in stuffy locations using unlikely on-site equipment. In their first movement, "Doctor, Doctor, Gimme Gas (In My Ass)," the six-person band research and field record every sound in a hospital to find their ideal instruments. They then perform their gig in a surgery room, where they use everything from heart rate monitors to vacuum pipes and oxygen tanks as percussive tools. Every subsequent movement scales up in level of illegality and general outlandishness, concluding in a fourth movement so extreme that even director Johannes Nilsson admitted in a San Francisco International Film Festival Q&A that it may not actually be feasible.

Eatcho has quit his dayjob. He's late on rent. He knows that being a full-time artist is difficult to impossible in Portland, Oregon, a town where everyone who makes your coffee, bags your groceries, or pours your beer has his or her own creative project to fund. Without a day job, making art can't possibly be a hobby; it has to pay the bills. Eatcho says it dawns on him regularly that, "[The situation] is kind of scary -- but I wouldn't want it any other way."
eatcho Mania and energy are as apparent in the man as in his work. As we sit and shout over espresso beans being ground, Eatcho sips his drink and tells me that one reason that he's able to work intensely is that he's an insomniac, averaging just four or five hours of sleep a night. This also means that, while the bedroom studio setup is constricting to a lot of artists, he prefers it. "When I get up, it's good to have my work right there," he explains. "I mean, I have that thing where I'm constantly running upstairs to put my ideas down."

SXSW is always a whirlwind of excitement, anticipation and energy. People flock from all over the world to see their favorite bands, films and interactive media projects. My favorite part of the week is the music. That's what draws me there. Thousands of bands, playing...

Animalistic, ritualistic romp with Nick Cave, entitled Meet Me At The Center Of The Earth -- going on from now through June 5th, 2011. You'd be a fool not to. ...

The San Francisco trio, BEEP, is equal parts experimental electronica, free jazz, and jam band -- a delectable mishmashing, ragbagging, hodgepodging mingle-mangle of sounds. The band's latest record, City Of The Future, will tickle the sensibilities of easily distracted individuals, while driving fans of the...

Canada has given us a lot to work with in terms of music, specifically indie rock. Scores of baby Brooklyn bands have tried to imitate the success of giants like Broken Social Scene, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, and Arcade Fire, with mixed success. BRAIDS is...

Since 1982, a shortwave radio station in Russia has been transmitting the same short, monotonous buzz tone at the rate of approximately 25 tones per minute, just about 24 hours a day, every day. That station, UVB-76, has since been nicknamed "The Buzzer," for...

The brainchild of Portland musicians Joe Haege and Corrina Repp, Tu Fawning is a band with its fingers spread far and wide. Each member of the co-ed quartet is an accomplished musician; all are multi-instrumentalists, and all have played in multiple bands. And while the band's last EP was released through Polyvinyl, Tu Fawning decided to self-release its debut album, Hearts On Hold, this time around.
At the core of this decision was a two-month nationwide tour, in which Tu Fawning filled in as Menomena's main support. "It seemed like the perfect opportunity to give Tu Fawning some national exposure, as well as [to] get the new record out there," says Repp. Unfortunately, because of time constraints, all signs were pointing to a 2011 release if the band wanted to work with outside labels.

"[Polyvinyl was] willing to help us with Hearts On Hold, but on such a minimal level we decided it made more sense to try and put it out by ourselves and to be proud of our work, and not hand it over to someone who liked it, but didn't seem to love it," Repp explains.

Listen to "Multiply A House" - DOWNLOAD MP3

The Titans Of Industry is a Seattle-based indie rock band with some oddball elements and vocals, which create a vibe reminiscent of bands like Of Montreal. Their new LMNOEP EP begins with "These Cold Hands," a catchy track with a curious mixture of pounding keys, strings,...