Portland artist, Mia Nolting, has been invited to participate in an artist residency at Halo Halo screen printing studio in Toronto, Canada. To celebrate the change of season, and raise funds to support Mia’s participation in this residency, ms.ms. will be hosting a seance-inspired event at the Together Gallery (togethergallery.com), this...

To copy and paste from Jagjaguwar's description: "Some of the questions raised when we announced the existence of Volcano Choir were 'When are they going to tour?' and 'How will they re-create this live?' The answers to those are 1) They will tour only in Japan, of course, and 2) With...

Just wanted to share this weirdo crazy-person-on-a-psych-couch video from the ever-so-strange New York band, Extra Life. In the words of John Gillanders who recently wrote up one of their shows in Seattle, "Extra Life are one of those bands that kind of cram as much shit as humanly possible into...

"Finn Bikkjen!" is nearly as catchy of an electopop song as you can get, and this crispy clean video is curious. Mysteriously-fabricked animal-human dancers and large papercut characters emerge from the woods, as if from a dream. ...

New "Swim Until You See Land" video by Scottish rockers, Frightened Rabbit. The video reminds me a bit of fireflies flying around at night on the east coast, and yeah, it's a little strange when one realizes that the 'fireflies' are actually flashlights people are swinging around; nonetheless, the indie-folk...

The album art for SUUNS newest album, Zeroes QC, serves as an appropriate visual introduction to the Montreal band's music. Featuring a high-contrast black-and-white photograph of a woman dressed in a glitter top, one can just barely make out outlines of trees against the dark background, as their silhouettes drape ambiguously over her face and body.

If SUUNS' brand of mysterious art rock were to take on a visual aesthetic, it would certainly look like this -- living in monochromes and being sprinkled occasionally with bright flashes which hint at beauty in deep places. Obvious aspects of their music -- incoherent mumblings over grinding basslines and electronics -- embrace the darkness, while lighter guitar elements and steady beats seem to offset that heaviness. The resulting sound is brooding and danceable, and singer and guitarist Ben Shemie's own description of SUUNS' music might be the most appropriate visual and poetic accompaniment.
"There is a kind of sense of falling backward that I think the songs conjure," says Shemie. "Or blindly driving your car into a wall. A sense of sadness in all the amazing things in the world."

"We are definitely influenced by visual art, and I suppose art of all kinds," he continues. "On a conceptual [and] intellectual [level,] many of our friends work in that medium, whether it be film or painting or whatever, so there is definitely an interest in what they are doing and what trends are happening in the visual art world in general... "You can definitely draw parallels to composition in a visual format versus a musical format. They draw upon the same tastes and impulses. None of our songs are 'based' on a film or picture or whatnot, but in some cases, I hear our songs as little plays, or films."

One look into SUUNS' own interpretation into their music lies in their video for "Up Past The Nursery," which was directed by Ben Shemie and Petros Kolyvas. The video is slow and complemplative, not unlike the song. Alternating between shots of the band standing idly in the woods and being suspended motionless in watery atmospheres, the video's subtle off-kilter color treatments and occasional overlays of fireworks serve as bursts of action in stillness.

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