Bleep is a weekly collection focusing on varying degrees of electronic music news, videos and MP3s. This week we feature a new track from Squarepusher, a Prins Thomas remix, some Joy Orbison news and more.

 

Squarepusher

It's been a long while since English producer Thomas Jenkinson, aka Squarepusher, has put out a record that reminded us all why we fell in love with him so many years ago. On Ufabulum, his fourteenth studio album since starting in 1994, Squarepusher seems hellbent on releasing one of the most powerful and startling records of the year. Returning to his more drum-and-bass meets acid house styling, Jenkinson has captured all of our attention in 2012 with both "Dark Steering" and the brand new "Drax 2." Ufabulum is out May 15th via Warp.

 

tUnE-yArDs' Merrill Garbus lends her voice to Elephant & Castle in this laid-back jazzy tune, which flies through prismatic landscapes feathered by bursts of light. In this highly digital rendering, balls of red and purple tones expand like nuclei in space, walking the line between hoakily animated and just artistically removed enough from our current plane of existence.

 

Visuals by Timeboy Elephant & Castle's latest record, Transitions, was released by Plug Research at the end of March 2012. You can also catch a live video of them performing "I Will" on a house stoop, below, along with a full tracklisting for the record.

 

Drawing from the beauty of the Pacific Northwest and one of the area's most majestic creatures, Rafael Anton Irisarri of The Sight Below and Thomas Meluch of Benoît Pioulard have breathed life into a new project, Orcas. On their debut self-titled disc, the two have created nine tracks of ambiance-heavy songs featuring a number of opposing elements, including light and dark, acoustic and electronic, textured subtlety and straight-forward hook. In that spirit of balance, this bilateral feature places side-by-side interview responses and sample tracks from both artists, to dissect the strengths, weaknesses, and sonic tendencies both musicians contribute to making Orcas the rich collaboration that it is.

Benoît Pioulard

"Sault" from Lasted Where Irisarri's soundscapes lay a gentle foundation for the work of Orcas, Meluch's work as Benoît Pioulard provides more accessible and structural elements, complete with singer-songwriter pop melodies. "Sault," from Benoît Pioulard's album Lasted, has guitar and vocal tendencies that connect to the piano and guitar lines of "Arrow Drawn," which is streaming below.

Rafael Anton Irisarri

"A Great Northern Sigh" from The North Bend As The Sight Below, Rafael Anton Irisarri's compositions rebuild familiar emotions and spaces by way of minimal electronic soundscapes. According to Irisarri, "A Great Northern Sigh" has conceptual and thematic ties to the work of Orcas, as it also relates to the Pacific Northwest. "Almost like an audio postcard," he adds. "What can I say -- I'm deeply inspired by this region and wouldn't imagine composing our Orcas album anywhere else."

 

When Ty Segall announced that he'd be releasing three albums in 2012, there seemed to be more excitement than skepticism, though the latter is usually the reaction toward most artists trying to pull off such a feat. I'm not sure if that speaks to the value of the Bay Area rocker's music, or if it speaks to people's genuine excitement for his style of grunge revival.

 

Last year's Goodbye Bread put Ty Segall on the national map in a way that albums like Lemons never managed to. In 2012, Segall seems hell bent on catching up the rest of his cronies -- the collaborators, conspirators and friends which have made southern California the hot bed for psych and garage rock in recent years -- to where he is now. Hair combines the talents of both Segall and White Fence, the stage name of Tim Presely. Presely has also released an album under the White Fence title this year, Family Perfume Vol. 1. Given that context for the album, there are plenty of people who know exactly what this album should sound like before ever hearing it. And, for better or for worse, those people are probably right. Take the more classic rock-influenced style of White Fence, a mutation of The Zombies and The Fall, and throw in some of Segall's ear-piercing guitar squeals and vocals, and you've got yourself the recipe for a pretty damn good album. Hair is maybe less impactful than these individuals have been in their own unique ways, and maybe the expectations from those in the know were a little lofty, but nonetheless, this seemingly inevitable album is still impressive.
SPECTRAL HYPNOSIS A recurring series, featuring mesmerizing songs for one to lose sense of time and space, mind and body.

Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs - "Tapes & Money" (John Talabot Remix)

In this remix of Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs "Tapes & Money," snippets of vocals are repeated almost to the point of ad nauseum. Many remixes of this song are available, including those by MJ Cole, Eats Everything, and Casino Times, but John Talabot is one with a singularly impressive ability to make such repetition not even the least bit boring. His "Ritual Deconstruction" mix seems to live up to its own name as it slowly and methodically chisels into one's brain with every click, tap, and refrain. The remix bundle came out on April 10th. Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs - "Tapes & Money" (John Talabot Remix) Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs will release his long-awaited debut album, Trouble, June 12th in the US via Casablanca Records. As far as I'm concerned, the original can be skipped in light of this vastly superior remix. But if you'd like to decide for yourself, you can stream it at YouTube.

 

Montreal-based producer, DJ, and electronic musician Michael Silver, also known as CFCF, has recently taken time out from his electronic creations and remix projects to embark on a new creative detour. On his April 2012 mini-LP, Exercises, CFCF stresses the beauty of classical music. Each track on Exercises is titled simply with a number and a one-word description, leaving listeners with the sense that the collection is one of experiments. Visually-evocative and conceptually-rich, Exercises sees Silver connecting his electronic roots wiht a desire to pay homage to musicians like Ryuichi Sakamoto and David Sylvian. This interview explores Exercises track-by-track, with insight from CFCF and a complete album stream. Where it is applicable, we have paired the tracks from Exercises with a supplementary influence. We begin with "A Flower Is Not A Flower," from composer Ryuichi Sakamoto's Playing The Piano, the album CFCF credits for sparking his initial interest in this project.

Listening Station Exercises Full Album Stream

Track-By-Track Conceptual Analysis

Exercise #1 (Entry) This marks a beginning, an entrance of sorts to the Exercises album. What got you interested in doing this more structured and piano-driven piece considering so much of your music is electronic-based? It began because I became addicted to Ryuichi Sakamoto's Playing the Piano. It was the soundtrack to my fall and winter, in late 2010 I guess. And from there it went to Chopin's Nocturnes and Glenn Gould and Philip Glass and some of David Borden's piano counterpoint pieces. So I decided to make a version of a track from my EP The River, "It Was Never Meant To Be This Way", that was mainly piano with some kind of reverb-drenched, non-lyrical vocals over it -- moaning I guess. And I cut together some footage from David Cronenberg's Stereo over it, and then it kind of became clear that this was something I wanted to explore a bit further and build a world [out] of. The piano patterns and the harsh lines of the brutalist architecture, and with the songs, [they] kind of fill in some kind of drama. CFCF's "It Was Never Meant To Be This Way (Piano Version)"

 

 

There is no real way to write this review without making it a personal journey of one kid's hardcore/punk ideals slowly but surely being whittled away by the realities of the world around him, until he finally realizes that as he grows older, the world doesn't necessarily grow old with him. For me, at least, that is how it seems. As the friend I attended the show with said it best, he first saw Rise Against opening for the Mad Caddies at The Vera Project in Seattle. I'm not one to generalize -- but I venture to say it's a fair guess that 99% of the crowd attending the arena spectacle of Rise Against and A Day to Remember at the ShoWare Center in Kent has no idea who the Mad Caddies are, or were even aware that at a time ska was actually a respectable genre. April 19th, 2012 @ ShoWare Center, Kent

 

In this compound post for Danish band Sleep Party People, we review the music videos for "Chin and "A Dark God Heart," and continue with an album review and full album stream for their latest, We Were Drifting On A Sad Song.

Sleep Party People are really trying their best to present their music as the kind for the moments between wake and sleep, and journalists lifting straight off the press release are certainly spreading this message along for no particular reason -- until now. This sleek and spacey video for "Chin" is certainly the best indicator of Sleep Party People's intentions yet, reaching true ballerina-meets-outerspace take-off about halfway through, when a succession of (irregular) hexagonal shapes remind you that you should watch Carl Sagan's Cosmos. (I've taken the liberty of posting a clip of that at the bottom of this post, because... why not?) This video, directed by Obscura and featuring dancer Caroline Baldwin, is just an all-around a delicious view, with its rainbow projections of space.

 

Featuring two members of the indie psych pop band Nurses, HOOPDREAMS is the result of three multi-instrumentalists from the Pacific Northwest loosening their reins on traditional songwriting. Dub-influenced beats, layered vocals spanning multiple octaves of harmony, and mysterious electronic noises are explored to evoke vaguely familiar feelings of nostalgia that rest densely upon the human psyche. DARKSUMMER has recently been remastered for Baltimore record label Dymaxion Groove, which will release the album on a limited-edition, red, full moon picture disc (seen below), so that everyone on this great big floating ball of ours can get their hands on a copy, starting July 15th, 2012.

 

Pre-order Vinyl on dymaxion.fm Pre-order CD on dymaxion.fm
To introduce listeners to this release, we're featuring seven of the best videos for the short track "Spirit Momentum," which were created in conjunction with REDEFINE's interdisciplinary show MMMicrofestival. Hand-picked video artists were invited to give their interpretations for HOOPDREAMS' short track, and they are showcased in this unique abstract motion art gallery. See full artwork and stream the entirety of DARKSUMMER at the bottom of this post.


Arn Gyssels

Belgium digital and mixed media artist Arn Gyssels took the lo-fi route, creating a work of symmetrical beauty that morphs in and out of vaguely distinguishable human figures.

 

Daniel Cantrell

Illustrator and video editor Daniel Cantrell has quite the brilliantly deranged sense of humor, as you'll see from this mash-up video (complete with custom sounds, alien eyes, and social commentary)!  
In April 2012, La Dispute announced their latest charity benefit project, Conversations, a packet consisting of a hand-assembled and multi-dimensional collection of items courtesy of La Dispute themselves, writers involved with 826michigan, and the band's artist friends. All proceeds from Conversations benefit 826michigan, a branch of Dave Eggers' literacy organization, 826 National. In this feature, we speak with vocalist Jordan Dreyer about their work with 826michigan and highlight all of the organizations they have worked with in-depth. As La Dispute continue to use their youth and energy to benefit the less fortunate, this on-going article will be updated to reflect their continued humanitarianism.

 

"Everything goes a long way. Every little thing counts." -- Jordan Dreyer
See all articles related to Non-profit and Charity work