2010 began on a dark note for artist Christopher Davison. His Disasters Are People Too series kicked off the year, and much like a poet or musician wearing his heart on his sleeve through words, Davison displayed his innermost feelings through strokes on canvas. The series was a reflection of the year 2009 -- a difficult year of transformation of Davison. Through the black-and-white gouache paintings featuring dismembered, mangled body parts floating through dark landscapes, one got the sense of incompleteness, and even the lack of gravity in the pieces did nothing to ease their weight.
"Overall, [2009] had me feeling like I had been knocked off my horse," Davison explains. "The economy was one thing, but I was also trying to push my art into new and unknown territory. It took the whole year for me to really feel like I had the brushes under control." For the first time, Davison began relying almost exclusively on gouache, as opposed to following his previous mixed media routine, which included the use of inks and pens. The darkness pervading the Disasters Are People Too series was heavy, but it was necessary fodder for Davison to move forward. His newer work is brighter and more colorful, and features what Davison calls a "genuine marriage" between his love for rich blacks and colors. They are well-balanced and seem to perfectly parallel Davison's personal tastes.

 

"I've always been a sucker for melancholic music and films. No one really borrows movies from me because when they look in my cabinet, they see Ingmar Bergman, Adam Curtis documentaries, or Jan Svankmajer animations. Likewise, the albums in my heavy rotation always sound better at night or in the winter. So, if media indicates anything, it’s that color may come and go, but black is here to stay." - Christopher Davison

 

Sometimes with music, especially when you're listening to a genre that's not a personal favorite, an album just needs time to grow on you. You may give it a few listens and walk away without much, if anything, to say. When you return a second...

Prince Of Tears is a historical drama directed by well-known Hong Kong film director, Yonfan. A look into 1950s Taiwan, the film documents a young family during an era when Communists -- and suspected Communists -- were questioned and detained by the Taiwanese government. It...

After Seattle underground superheroes Carissa's Wierd disbanded, Sera Cahoone went on to do her own thing, Ben Bridwell came up with Band Of Horses and Grand Archives, and Jenn Ghetto became S. If you weren't around ora conscious while Carissa's Wierd was around, here is what...

This is rather sad news. Falling down an elevator shaft...

A journey to the sea sometimes is a ritual -- an escape from the responsibilities and tribulations that lurk around every corner in the big cities. For school kids, a trip to the sea is almost a requirement for the perfect summer vacation. For a...

Alone in Four Walls is a beautifully-shot look at youths who spend their time in reformatory facilities for youngsters between the ages up to the age of the fourteen. Husband and wife duo Alexandra Westmeier and Inigo Westmeier have managed to capture the stories of...

Phillippines, 2006, 35mm, Tagalog (with subtitles) Jeffrey Jeturian’s film revolves around luck. Amy, a middle-aged woman who endlessly roams the winding streets of her Manila neighborhood relies entirely on it. Searching for people to place bets on jueteng, a popular gambling game in the Philippines, her...