Hedi Slimane has a really simple website where she takes one photograph a day and lays it all out vertically -- one giant black-and-white photograph at a time. Most of the shots are portraits, and the best part of this layout lies in the fact...

I suppose I feel kind of lucky I've been introduced to the work of Brooklyn New Jersey artist LNY. His artwork is literally my perfect aesthetic pleasure, as it combines expert color theory with line work that makes me want to drool. In addition to...

Sometimes an artist will do something so simply wonderful that you can only think that it's, well, kind of dumb. It's dumb how creatively brilliant he or she is, kind of like ugly animals and pets sometimes appear to be adorable. That's how I feel...

This post is actually going to feature two different series of works by Luis Dourado, Famous Are Dreaming and Into Space. But in my book, they belong together, dammit. The famous belong to the spacey dreams, so I'm going to sort them accordingly (and see...

... epic. Having just stumbled across the website of Eliot Lee Hazel for the first time ever, all I can think is... why and how is all his work so bloody brilliant?!! With photography that certainly runs the gamut in terms of film quality and overall style,...

I just recently came across Synaptic Stimuli, a blog with the all-too-appropriate tagline of Transmissions of Consciousness and States of Being. In addition to that, they just generally have very amazing, life-affirming content that makes you appreciate all of the complexities and possibilities of nature...

Olek, born Agata Oleksiak, is a Polish artist who has chosen crocheting as her preferred art medium so that she can simultaneously watch movies and make art. This stuff is borderline (or maybe not so borderline) obsessive compulsive; one can only imagine that she is...

RMN has a collection of photography by Hervé Lewandowski entitled Album de photographies spirites : spectre et voiles. The black-and-white and sepia images from the 1900s are subtly haunting and feature multiple exposures of people in Victorian-era garb. If you'll look closely, you'll see many...

Ever since interviewing Chandra Bocci way back when, I've been looking for another 3D artist that utilized shapes and textures in a way that felt equally powerful to me. I haven't really found one... until today, with the work of Sarah Applebaum! By weaving fabric into patterns that are just bursting with color and texture and richness, she transforms rooms (and camouflaged people hidden within them) into caves that would probably make some people claustrophobic by their sheer intensity. I imagine that stepping into a space given the Applebaum treatment would turn even the most reserved of art critics into a somewhat synesthesic fellow or madam.

 

Read our interview with Sarah Applebaum