Glasgow, Scotland's Errors roam through all landscapes -- terrestrial, aquatic, otherworldly, rave-y -- in this video for "Magna Encarta", sometimes with a chicken as their prime focus, and sometimes not. All landscapes become intertwined with one another throughout the course of the video, however, with the chicken remaining the only...

In a feat of pure wonder, Brooklyn-based quartet Screens have managed to evade the magnetic lure of musical stagnation with their latest album, Dead House. Without adhering too closely to any one genre tag, they pull bits and pieces of influence from "pop," "psychedelic," "noise," "post-punk," and "post-rock" when and...

Tickets for the Mogwai show went on sale absurdly early, at least four months or so before the concert rolled around. On the night of the show, there were a few procrastinating individuals milling around the Showbox at the Market desperately looking for tickets, which was fitting considering Mogwai's new...

The debut full-length album from Stockholm brother-sister duo Dag För Dag, entitled Boo, starts off with a short introduction track. At the end of this 30-second preface, there is a distant, "One...

If you didn't know that twine being pulled in different directions or the slight bowing of cello strings could be beautiful, this video will make you think otherwise. This video is gentle like "Embrace" from Ben Sollee's upcoming album, Inclusions; it is slow and calming, like a church hymn. Directed by...

There's been a swell of dark loud psych-prog coming out these days, which I for one couldn't be happier about. In the last six months or so, I've found myself completely immersed in new discs by Lesbian, Titan, the Psychic Paramount, Intronaut, and now, Hidden Number. It's not like I...

Californians Troubled Coast aren't breaking new ground here. Their latest effort, Letters, takes a cue from the recently desceased Crime In Stereo, who had long made an effort to mix elements of shoegaze, indie rock and hardcore along with references to Bukowski and paying off student loans. While Troubled Coast's...

The influence Robert Pollard's genius still casts on the Central Ohio music scene is kind of unbelievable. In the seventeen years after Bee Thousand rocketed and the then school teacher rose to international semi-stardom and cult icon status, lo-fi bedroom pop has yet to go out of style in places...

Directed by Ola Simonsson and Johannes Stjärne Nilsson Sound Of Noise is labeled as a black humor and oddball action film, which it is. More than anything, though, it is a music film – one which celebrates and pays homage to experimental music, as well as avant-garde classical composers. From the hand-drawn opening credits of Sound Of Noise, I knew there would be something punk rock about this film, and there certainly is. A pair of misfits -- a music school dropout and a stoic songwriter -- enlist four percussionists to join them for a four-movement composition entitled Music For One City And Six Drummers. Executed in true anarchist fashion, the movements take on the form of musical flash mobs, performed in stuffy locations using unlikely on-site equipment. In their first movement, "Doctor, Doctor, Gimme Gas (In My Ass)," the six-person band research and field record every sound in a hospital to find their ideal instruments. They then perform their gig in a surgery room, where they use everything from heart rate monitors to vacuum pipes and oxygen tanks as percussive tools. Every subsequent movement scales up in level of illegality and general outlandishness, concluding in a fourth movement so extreme that even director Johannes Nilsson admitted in a San Francisco International Film Festival Q&A that it may not actually be feasible.