Tomorrow, at Golden Rule, is an installation featuring works loosely themed around things that are Unnatural. Here's what guest curator Aidan Koch has to say about this: "The idea of what is unnatural is of course, a very subjective matter. There's a few things that could...

Just stumbled across a few prints by printmaking duo Apenest when searching for a t-shirt of my eternal live performance favorites These Arms Are Snakes. This is their design: In fact, I'm not sure where one can attain this and am in the midst of conducting...

It's that time of year, so why not get some affordable art prints for friends and family? I'm talking a potential cost of less than $20 for each of these prints. Visit Johan Thörnqvist's website to buy, buy, buy, and to view more prints. They're...

In our culture, Disney movies have led us to equate fairy tales with fluffy princess dresses, singing mice, and happily ever after endings, but this is a purely Westernized notion -- and a recent one, at that. Historically, folklore from other cultural traditions can be quite dark and morbid, and a measure of nuance and impact is lost when mythological figures are sanitized and watered down. Stacey Rozich is an artist who creates paintings that place folklore and fairytales in their traditional and rightful place of unsettling richness.
stacey rozich Rozich is a Seattle native and grew up in a creative household; her father and sister are both artists, and she was raised to view the act of making art as a normal part of everyday life. "My father always told me, 'Draw every day," she explains over beers at her house. "And so, I did." Rozich has a strong work ethic and has always been prolific in her work, but she has honed her focus and fully hit her stride with her current series of images. She credits her fascination with folk iconography in part to the rich cultural heritage and imposing natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest, but her interest also stems from her family's Croatian roots. Rozich draws heavily from her Eastern European background, cobbling together elements of traditional Croatian folklore with a hodgepodge of influences borrowed from other cultures. She is a dedicated researcher, and while her patterns give the impression of being effortlessly created, that measured nonchalance is the result of Rozich's careful search and study of intriguing reference materials. Her interest in patterns was a tangent that eventually became the focus of her works. "I did a lot of wolves at first," she says, "but then lost interest because everyone is doing the whole woodland creature thing. So instead, I sat down and started to focus more on the patterns."
"As I got older, I learned that if you can convey a story with an image, then you're good; you're golden. So I focused on having this background narrative that wasn't quite obvious, yet each piece has a little vignette -- a little drama in it." - Stacey Rozich

 

There's a lot of personality to Kate Pugsley's charming illustrations. Her figures traipse about washed out earthtone backgrounds looking somewhat forlorn but also vaguely whimsical, and their expressions give the indication that they're lost in very far away thought. Her ladies also rock some pretty...

I've always had a real soft spot for 1970's illustration because everything looks as though it's drawn with noodles. Yay for gratuitious wiggly lines everywhere! I love noodles, both as a drawing style and as a tasty snack. Mmm...

The album cover for Flying Lotus' latest EP, Pattern+Grid World, features a close-up portrait of one of Portland illustrator Theo Ellsworth's intricate, feathery characters. With an album title like Pattern+Grid World, Flying Lotus certainly could have taken the artwork into any number of stereotypically "cool" directions, but instead, he chose to go with the soft rippling drawings of Ellsworth. And from this was born mutual inspiration, with artist inspiring musician and musician inspiring artist.

Below, we spoke briefly with Ellsworth behind his process of creation. You can also read our previous interview with Ellsworth here.

 

Joe Vollan I feel like Joe Vollan's work is a love-it or hate-it affair. But if you're feeling the well-rendered, cutesy details of his pieces, chances are you'll be feeling them a lot. Below, a couple pieces that serve as throwbacks to another time, complete with...

I really like what Brooklyn artist Mark Dean Veca is doing with himself. He takes poppy street art characters and combines them with intricate patterns and ornamentation to create some large, pretty raw illustrations that kind of make it feel like you're residing within someone's...

As of today, you have one more week left to snag some Bigfoot pieces from Flatcolor Gallery (528 First Avenue South, Seattle, WA) -- lucky you! Snatch 'em up while you still can! The full-color painted pieces are not cheap, but I don't imagine they'll...