Our Hands Will Eventually Destroy Everything Beautiful, a new body of work by Japanese illustrator Fumi Nakamura, is the result of a personal period of growth. After a mental breakdown and a year of hiatus from art, Nakamura realized that she needed to leave behind a past of pain and suffering to grow into the person she is now becoming. "I was chasing after unrealistic thoughts and hopes during that year... Then one day, something inside of me snapped and I came to the realization that I need to move on and get rid of my 'problems' -- beautiful memories with someone I loved, childhood trauma, pains of growing up and literally everything since they were the core source of my regrets and grudges..." Nakamura says in an interview with Thinkspace Gallery. "... I had (and still do have) a problem with holding onto the past heavily to the point where it was making me so miserable. I wanted to change and stop running away from reality -- in order to do that, I decided to "destroy." So I can maintain pieces of life together, survive in a place called "life." I became honest, out-spoken and decided to cut all the things out that are affecting me and my life negatively." These new pieces by Nakamura use negative space and delicate graphite and colored pencil drawings to accentuate the"intense but fragile," and ultimately, serve as captive reminders of human fragility. Though these images are beautiful, there is a darkness to them; animals are shot straight through by arrows, eyeballs are held in hands, and symbols of death are given significant attention.

Converge frontman Jacob Bannon --just-- released a series of limited edition prints in his shop. Among these is a piece of art he did for Trap Them's Seizures In Barren Praise album. xxx I've chosen my favorite color combination from five available silkscreen prints. These are a...

Eatcho has quit his dayjob. He's late on rent. He knows that being a full-time artist is difficult to impossible in Portland, Oregon, a town where everyone who makes your coffee, bags your groceries, or pours your beer has his or her own creative project to fund. Without a day job, making art can't possibly be a hobby; it has to pay the bills. Eatcho says it dawns on him regularly that, "[The situation] is kind of scary -- but I wouldn't want it any other way."
eatcho Mania and energy are as apparent in the man as in his work. As we sit and shout over espresso beans being ground, Eatcho sips his drink and tells me that one reason that he's able to work intensely is that he's an insomniac, averaging just four or five hours of sleep a night. This also means that, while the bedroom studio setup is constricting to a lot of artists, he prefers it. "When I get up, it's good to have my work right there," he explains. "I mean, I have that thing where I'm constantly running upstairs to put my ideas down."

Second illustrated song of the Silver Jews very last set from their very last show. All text by David Berman....

This last month was the two year anniversary of the end of the Silver Jews, one of my favorite bands of all time. I decided that the weekly comic is going to be exclusively illustrated lyrics for the foreseeable future, starting with songs from the...

Dictionary pages certainly have their musty old charms! From their familiar smells to their singular text arrangements, their surfaces are perfect for artists like Becky Holladay to build off of with colorful illustrations. These are from her series of Pen&Inc pieces. ...