This stark series of acrylic paintings is entitled Collision. It features animals in various stages of the death and life cycle are set upon a square of urban space, feeling like small-scale museum installations. This show opens in Denver tonight, from 7:00pm to 10:00pm, at...

Gean Moreno's website hasn't been updated in a while (since 2004), but his layered collage works are new to me. The pieces are like erupting geodes, or something -- layers of patterned lava flowing outwards and engulfing one another! It's like looking at layers of...

"Finn Bikkjen!" is nearly as catchy of an electopop song as you can get, and this crispy clean video is curious. Mysteriously-fabricked animal-human dancers and large papercut characters emerge from the woods, as if from a dream. ...

Thanks to http://www.booooooom.com/, we've discovered these really intricate carved skulls by Dimitri Tsykalov, made from miscellaneous fruits and vegetables. Visit his website for more. ...

Jeremy Mangan makes paintings of barns. Barns are not in and of themselves fascinating subjects, and it's hard to escape the cliché imagery associated with them -- of wheat fields and bucolic pastures. But Jeremy Mangan makes barns magical.
jeremy mangan Mangan grew up in rural Washington but spent a number of years living in New York while attending graduate school at Hunter College. His interest in shantytowns and weather-worn buildings began with observations of his surroundings, and was later informed by the urban layering of New York City. "I think what [my interest] comes from is a combination of growing up here and always being attracted to these dilapidated old structures," Mangan explains over coffee. "And then in New York, the overbuilt stacking, the literal hierarchy -- where the higher up you are, the higher up you are. You look up and you see the penthouses, and then you look down and you go into a subway." When Mangan first began his explorations into rural Americana, he was working with a very unorthodox medium. "I was painting fairly realistic, naturalistic subject matter at that point, and I was frustrated, so I decided I would just use the dumbest material I could find -- something that wasn't meant for art making and wasn't so precise," Mangan explains. "So I just bought a cup of coffee from the local bodega and started painting with it."
"Music does something kind of like poetry does. We can access music and listen to music and it doesn't have the expectations on it that visual art does, to be important or meaningful or to have direct social commentary... There's just something visceral and direct about it that I want to be in my paintings also." - Jeremy Mangan
Looking at his work, it's hard to believe that Mangan managed to achieve such an impressive array of depth and tones using coffee, but he has always been a technically skilled artist. He attributes much of his painting technique to his time spent as an ice carver. While finishing his graduate degree, Mangan's studio shared a building with Okamato Studio, the ice sculpting business of Takeo and Shintaro Okamoto. "They knocked on my studio one day and said, 'Hey, I need to deliver this ice sculpture; I could use a hand with it.'" At first Mangan only helped with the deliveries, but he was gradually entrusted with more responsibilities. Eventually they let Mangan try his hand at carving. "They gave me a 300 pound block of ice and a chainsaw and said, 'Go for it.'" Mangan's experience with carving fundamentally changed the way he approached painting. "As a painter, I could look at a face as a mug shot, and then in profile, and imagine how I would render it and how the line should be, but ice sculpture made me think in terms of volume, and that took a while to learn." This sojourn as an ice sculptor led Mangan to many interesting situations, including one assignment making a giant reindeer for Martha Stewart's holiday party. "She seemed very... uh... composed. Like she was working. Very smiley, almost robotic. What you might expect." Although it was a day job that involved creating and working with his hands, Mangan ultimately felt that he needed to leave New York and make more time for the work he wanted to pursue. "I was working 40, 50 hours a week carving ice, and I didn't go that far away to become an ice carver. It was just a job. I wasn't painting... I joke that I needed to leave New York and move to Fife for things to really start coming together." jeremy mangan

Wow, what a beautiful video by anticon. artists BATHS. This video combines the brutality found in Japanese samurai films with an almost Venetian carnival quality to create a video that treats the ephemeral in just a really remarkable way. Directed by Alex Takacs and Joe Nankin...

As of Last Thursday, Brin Levinson has some pieces from his Paradise Urbania series, on display at Optic Nerve Arts (1223 NE Alberta Street, Portland, OR). These pieces combine some excellently rendered images of Portland bridges, and what they might look like if wild animals...

These photos are quite old, but they're new to me. Photographer Phyllis Galembo takes colorful portraits of individuals in developing countries and captures the richness and beauty in their everyday dress and surroundings. These photos are large-scale color images capturing ritual adornment in Nigeria, Benin...

Bugs, bats, flowers, nature, and squishy things blend atop each other in this abstract blur of a video for "Bicycle", off of Memory Tapes' first album, Seek Magic. Lots international Memory Tapes tour dates to come -- a lot of them with Missy Elliott and...