Rob Crow is a man of multiple musical ventures. One could even say he is a man of multiple musical adventures: hailing from very distinct bands such as Pinback, Goblin Cock, The Ladies, Heavy Vegetable, and Thingy (amidst several others), he now brings...

Noting that this group comes from Alabama originally, expectations might stereotype that there would be a country or folk flavor to this record. Such tones are clearly there, be it in the use of the saw or the accordion as featured instruments or be...

Dominant Legs' latest release, Invitation, has positive energy and a light sound, but still contains a melodic fusion of multiple styles. It has a mix of an '80s pop sound and a mid-'90s jam band sensibility: like Wham! meets Rusted Root (the former...

During my first listen to this record, I hated it. It seemed whiney, and the tape hiss and overall crunchiness overshadowed the melodies. The songs were like musical vitamins, so concentrated my body couldn't absorb them. But after a few more listens, the...

It is a good sign that this teaser EP, The Sound Of Ghosts, only makes me want to hear more tracks from Brown Bird. All four tracks share a similar essence and so I can easily associate them as all being the products of...

Born With Stripes is a chameleon of an album. It starts off with a catchy, pop -- "accessible indie," as I like to call it -- number, entitled "We Don't Know Who We Are." This album has so many varied styles (from blues to psychedelic to Indian-influenced) that I don't think this album quite knows who it is; but that's okay.

This first track and its two subsequent tracks have been on consistent rotation in my brain since I first listened to this disc. Track two, "I Like The Way You Walk," is a very inviting tune, and it does associate well with "We Don't Know Who We Are"; these two songs are from the same family, as it were. However, track three, "Bloodhound," enters the scene and all bets are off. This is the stone cold blues track of Born With Stripes. It is easily my vote for best track on the entire album. With lines like, "I'll need a bloodhound just to track her down, but she'll be mine again," and carefully-placed background "oooo-oooo"'s, it is difficult not to love this song. But that's the genius of blues; it is a stereotypically cool genre of music (and what a nice stereotype to have!).

The "West Coast Raga" and later "East Coast Raga" would fit in well as B-Sides to The Beatles' 1966 classic Revolver, with their sitar sounds, spiraling guitar lines, and hypnotic basslines and drum beats. These tracks stick out and clash with the other tracks until about halfway through these songs, when the listener gets enveloped by them; and, at that point, it is all aural gravy. A friend overheard me listening to "Bullfrog Blues" and said it could very easily be a lost Lovin' Spoonful track. On that note, I feel that "New Blue Stockings" has a Doors-y or Jefferson Airplane-y motif to it. So, the '60s are represented very well in this disc.

The debut full-length album from Stockholm brother-sister duo Dag För Dag, entitled Boo, starts off with a short introduction track. At the end of this 30-second preface, there is a distant, "One...

Rick Shaffer's sophomore solo record, Hidden Charms, is a gritty, fuzzy, and dusty blues-rock album that is perfect for long car rides and smoky bars. It starts abruptly, almost as if we missed the first few seconds of the first song, entitled "No Big...