I've always been fascinated with music that feels removed, purposefully or not, form the time period in which it is being created. Some records feel dated in a disparaging sense, but the new album from Water Borders sounds like a beautifully scripted scene from a medieval play performed in the...

Dominant Legs' latest release, Invitation, has positive energy and a light sound, but still contains a melodic fusion of multiple styles. It has a mix of an '80s pop sound and a mid-'90s jam band sensibility: like Wham! meets Rusted Root (the former of which is a favorite...

The Pictureplane tour stop in Los Angeles saw him as an addition to Check Yo Ponytail 2, a recurring Tuesday night coalition of IHEARTCOMIX and The Echoplex. Word on the street was that UK's Holy Other had to drop from the bill due to illness -- or so Holy Other's...

One of the most appealing aspects of Portland dance band Guidance Counselor has always been frontman Ian Anderson's ability to incorporate punk rock rawness into the frequently frou-frou genre, to create dance punk with an heaping dose of swagger. At times, Anderson comes off like a garage-dwelling, lo-fi James Murphy...

On Feathersongs For Factory Girls, Part Two, San Francisco's Stripmall Architecture create a sonic space that is a bit disorienting. Rebecca Coseboom's vocals swirl like a cloud of smoke while electro beats, violins, and cello induce chills. The songs carry a strong volatile sensation similar to that of a treacherous...

Time to take a break from the psychedelic video imagery to visit John Vanderslice, in a live collaboration with Magik*Magik Orchestra. This video for "Overcoat" is filmed in the studio during recording, and is from his album, White Wilderness. ...

The debut full-length album from Stockholm brother-sister duo Dag För Dag, entitled Boo, starts off with a short introduction track. At the end of this 30-second preface, there is a distant, "One...

As you drive aimlessly and helplessly through the grimy lower portions of known Los Angeles, you may find yourself lost on the most eastern part of Beverly boulevard. In a neighborhood known colloquially as Hi-Fi (Historic Filipinotown), this stretch of road is a far cry from the Julia Roberts...

With an unrelenting feel-good sound, canny lyrics and a frontman with a history of being a traveling troubadour, Sonny And The Sunsets could without a doubt be transported a few decades back and fit in as comic book and cartoon show with the likes of Josie And The Pussycats. Although band leader Sonny Smith actually already has a project called 100 Records where he creates music for fictional bands, there is nothing hypothetical about the eminence of Sonny And The Sunsets' sophomore release. Appropriately titled Hit After Hit, the album could be the soundtrack to a riotous sock hop, and each song is an animated story on its own.

The steady opener "She Plays Yo-Yo With My Mind" smoothly eases listeners into the escapades that will follow, as the lyrics hint at the album's radiance. Smith sings, "When I see you/ The sun starts to shine," which is exactly what happens at the tick of the album's first note. Smith talks about a girl messing with his head, yet he shows little frustration. He remains calm, and there is nothing alarming about his voice, which is one of the reasons that the music is so accessible. He is the level-headed character that never panics.