According to the introductory statement to the Festival's website, "Festival of Ideas for the New City is a major new collaborative initiative in New York, involving scores of Downtown organizations working together to harness the power of the creative community to imagine the future city...

According to the introductory statement to the Festival's website, "Festival of Ideas for the New City is a major new collaborative initiative in New York, involving scores of Downtown organizations working together to harness the power of the creative community to imagine the future city...

"Since most art dealing with consumerism seems too matter-of-fact, I want my work to be allegorical, being humorous and visually interesting but imparting a deeper message. Why the hell do we need all this stuff, anyways?"...

2011 is coming! To keep track of our ever-dwindling days, why don't we invest in some calendars? I've got some top-notch calendar picks for you here...

In 2009, Ben Sollee, with some help from Oxfam America, rode from his hometown of Lexington, Kentucky, to Bonnaroo Festival, playing shows in small towns along the way. Later that year, Sollee embarked on a 500-mile, 16-day tour along the East Coast Greenway during the frigid winter months.

In 2010, as bands are increasingly partnering up with environmental and social justice organizations to bring attention causes they believe in, Sollee and crew have partnered up with Kentucky Coffeetree Cafe on a tour with a much more personal meaning. Their "Ditch The Van Tour" might have a name that implies an environmentally-motivated inspiration, but that is merely a perk. The main message Sollee and crew are hoping to spread is one of community-building and simply taking a slow breath in our hectic lives. Additionally, Sollee and crew are embarking on this journey with the idea that this could, in fact, be a viable touring option for bands. "Ditch The Van" is just as much business-minded as it is substance-minded.

When we caught up with Sollee on the telephone, he was riding an Amtrak train from Santa Barbara to Salinas, California. It was a brief respite for the group, so that they could continue the Northern California leg of their bike tour freshly recouped.


And so another year's Seattle International Film Festival comes to a close. You might be saying "Hey! You only watched like eight movies? What kind of publication is this?!" Tut tut, readers. We here at Redefine watched a boat load of movies! We just...

This week's recommended picks! Go to the website for the Seattle International Film Festival for more details. Some Days Are Better Than Others Four Portlanders with different -- yet very Portland, Oregon-esque -- lives spend their days trying to find meaningful human connections. The sell here is...

Director: Nick Stringer United Kingdom, 2009 [caption id="attachment_43896" align="alignnone" width="700"] Newborn Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchling on the beach in Juno, FL.[/caption] I am a Loggerhead turtle. I break out of shell and sand. I traverse the land to reach the sea. The crabs and gulls see me as prey, but I am determined, I must satiate this driving hunger that permeates my being, I must continue forward. It is along the Gulf Stream that I navigate. Heading north on my float-sum raft with companions in the shape of sea horses and fish that have camouflage exteriors to mimic the vessel we reside upon. I am still soft shelled. I need to grow and rest. A strange stillness envelopes our journey. We have been driven off course into a timeless Sargasso sea. Within moments a great beast obliterates our raft, tossing apart what kept alive my companions. I am alone now. I must use my arms to regain my sense of direction. I search and search. I swim through swamps of black sludge that sticks to my body. I pass the carcass of a turtle just like me, hollow in the eyes, covered in thick oil. I pass beautiful shinny float-sum. I am so hungry I eat it, but it does not break apart. It does not taste like anything. Ahead of me I see translucent orbs with beaded strands swaying in a breeze created by the creatures. Their movement is hypnotic. Their movement entices me, fuels my hunger. Is that a fish I see, encased in their arms, encased in death? I can't tell, all I know is that I must eat this tantalizing creature. The first bite releases delicious chewy sustenance. In this consumption I am aware that eons of ancestors developed a tolerance to the poison, to make food out of an enemy. I again am hopeful. I know I can find my way out of this limbo. Back in the Gulf Stream. How long has it been? I am older now. Larger, but still not as large as the magnificent humpback whale. Or the sleek blue shark. I trail behind them on my own journey, but I am curious about where they go. How long have they been making this voyage? In the North Sea the sky above the roof of the ocean sends down torrents of water droplets. It sends down thousands of hands that thrust apart portions of the surface, making waves, colliding with each other. I am too small to fight this energy. I give up and allow the current to take me towards the imposing rocky pillars of the shore. Tranquility again. I swim away from the stone island, in a sea that is rapidly cooling. I makes me sleepy, as though I could just rest forever. But at night, I see the magnetic beacon. The shimmery curtain of light in the sky. I reminds me of my journey. Of the path I need to continue to follow. Back south I have broken free of the Gulf Stream and head towards the warm waters of the Azores. In this place I can truly rest and build up my strength. Among the schools of fish and coral, are others like me. Some have been here a long time. Some are just arriving. I see their shapes floating by and wonder what their paths were like. I burrow into the sandy floor and sleep.

These works from Pawling Print Studio really speak for themselves. Sister duo Janet and Trisha create patterned works for the home, and make bland everyday objects a little less so. It's the little things that count! (They also use recycled materials. Can't complain there.)  ...

This is a really quick second post, in honor of Earth Day! Mark Langan shows that some recycled art can actually be pretty darn neat. His personal statement, a testament to texture, sums it all up:  "My personal interpretation to the term 'Corrugated Art' is the...