After a few years' hiatus, Sunderland's Field Music are back with an album -- and a double one, at that. This was not the typical hiatus, as the two founding members of the band released solo records during that period, with David Brewis recording as...

Upon first listen to Odd Blood, Brooklyn-based band Yeasayer's sophomore album, those familiar with their debut All Hour Cymbals might scratch their heads and wonder if they are playing a practical joke on the listeners. Their debut was marked by folky, quirky, pop-melded tunes. On Odd Blood, Yeasayer seems to shrug off any expectations of continuity or reasonable transition. In order to wrap one's mind around the drastic change in musical approach, here is a brief play by play to clarify exactly what this means:
The opener, "The Children" features ominous, synthesized voices in a chanting style. The effect is unsettling. Luckily, this is a clear fake out: the second track, and the overwhelming choice for single, is "Ambling Alp," a positive anthem urging the listener to, "Stick up for yourself son/ No matter what anybody else does." From there, the tone is set -- swirly, and much more electronic than anything on All Hour Cymbals. Within this format, the midpoint, "O.N.E." is a clear winner: bouncy, fun, and making the most of the vocal talent that has defined Yeasayer in the past. "I Remember" is a mournful, emotional mix overdubbed with a ton of the bells and whistles that an over-produced album should have, but with the unique octaves that the vocalists are able to achieve. "Love Me Girl" sounds like it should be on a Justin Timberlake album, and "Mondegreen" is a funky dance track with the nice touch of group vocals and baritone sax. YEASAYER - ODD BLOOD ALBUM REVIEW CONTINUES BELOW

One-man bands usually call to mind images of a comical minstrel barely standing under the weight of a drum-and-harmonica contraption and self-penned songs that probably belong in a sideshow rather than on a CD. But Chris Otepka, the indie rock artist from Illinois performing under...

There's an episode on Season One of The Mighty Boosh where Vince Noir declares that it's impossible to be unhappy in a poncho. I've yet to test this theory, but I have doubts as to its validity, based on some photos I've seen of Mexico...

Listening to the newest album by Nick Cocozzella's latest project calls up a feeling not unlike that of stumbling upon Conor Oberst in your iTunes library after years of not listening to heart-wrenching Bright Eyes ballads. But even though we can recall the same adolescent...

It might take a few listens to get into, but Raina Rose's third full-length album, When May Came, will surprise you with its cohesion and simplicity. Between her big voice, with its unusual blend of twang and jazziness, and her whimsical sense of storytelling, Rose...

Boy Genius hail from the musical hotbed of Brooklyn, NY, yet have none of the stylings one would expect from a such a stereotypically hip community. A sort of off-kilter country-tinged pop blend in the vein of Wilco and The New Pornographers, Boy Genius fail...

Without lyrics, instrumental music often gets confined to the background, serving as an accompanying soundtrack to a movie or television series. Fortunately, despite having songs that were used on the TV adaptation of This American Life, Pale White Moon's debut, Call Of The Wolf Peach,...