Justin Kane Elder has only recently emerged onto the Seattle art scene, but he's already commanding our attention. Trained as a finish carpenter1 and hailing from a family peppered with luthiers2 and tradesman, Elder is comfortable moving fluidly across the often contentious boundary of art and craft. Elder's work demands a carpenter's keen attention to angle and detail, coupled with a painter's sense of fluid composition. Elder creates large-scale spray paint portraits by applying numerous layers of precisely stenciled abstract shapes, and his dynamic overlays create a constantly radiating sense of movement. His current portrait subjects are his friends or pop culture icons, and he manages to create crisp, defined compositions without employing any actual linework.
justin kane elder I headed over to Justin's house for an interview and spent the duration of our conversation kept constant company by Raleigh, his adorably hyperactive Boston Terrier. Elder's house immediately gives the comfortable impression of being inhabited by creative people who are very good at what they do but don't feel a need to overtly broadcast it. Elder's girlfriend is a designer, and between the two of them, the house is full of strange, enticingly colorful objects. Elder's studio is set up in his basement, and his workspace is indicative of his artistic priorities: his table saw is front and center, and his spray cans are arranged on a hand-built table that captures the precision of someone who is used to working in measurements of a 32nd of an inch. A large basement wall serves as scratch paper. "It's my sketchbook!" Elder says, laughing.

Flatcolor Gallery does an ace thing once again, with Obsessive Repulsive, curated by Ryan Bubnis! Bubnis, alongside Jesse Reno and Skinner, will be displaying new works that are simultaneously adorable and depressing/brutal, and the freedom each of them has when creating new forms is evident. Check out some images from...

Seattle street artists No Touching Ground, NKO, and Dan Hawkins crafted a tomb project last year, which was a "case study in the archeology of memory." CLICK HERE TO READ JEN GRAVES' ARTICLE IN THE STRANGER ABOUT THE PROJECT. That particular project was a bit hidden to the public, but the three...

Now at pun(c)tuation (705A East Pike St., Seattle, WA), are sculptural works by Keith Murakata. The series is heavil centered around comic book character Captain America, who, according to Wikipedia, first appeared in Marvel Comics' 1940s predecessor, Timely Comics as an "...

Go to Roq La Rue (2312 2nd Ave, Seattle, WA) on January 14th. It will be incredible. The opening, which will feature the mixed media photography and sculpture of the ever-talented Mandy Greer, the show sees Roq La Rue transformed into a multi-chamber installation. Textiles are sewn, knotted, and manipulated to...

It's always a pleasure to see stencils used in unorthodox ways, and Seattle artist Greg Boudreau provides some stunning examples of just how versatile the medium can be. Greg works predominantly on salvaged wood, and he manages to get some extremely detailed and unexpected atmospheric effects out of medium not...

It's hard to believe that these aren't computer generated, but Seattle's Justine Ashbee creates these detailed, morphing compositions using nothing but paint pens. Part topographic map and part biological form, Justine cites zen calligraphy and wave forms among her influences. ...

Seattle's First Thursday is massive; here are some selections from some galleries we regularly enjoy. And, can I just say? Seattle is really rockin and rollin this month, with tons of really excellent and innovative exhibitions. We just did the post for Portland's First Thursday, and Seattle's is making Portland's...

For her 365-day project, illustrator Lisa Congdon certainly picked a unique task. She has decided to put together a collection of one theme a day, ranging from pencils to foreign books, thread to postcards, baggage tags to lichen. And all of it is laid out beautifully -- so beautifully, in...