SPECTRAL HYPNOSIS A recurring series, featuring mesmerizing songs for one to lose sense of time and space, mind and body. Hitting the electronic-psych-rock tip today with two bands often loved and supported by REDEFINE -- Oakland's Lumerians and Seattle's Midday Veil -- as well as a Drag City release from the somewhat controversial Father Yod & The Source Family.

 

Lumerians

Oakland's Lumerians have an upcoming release from Permanent Records in the USA and Hands In The Dark Records in Europe Transmissions From Telos: Vol.IV, out on July 5th. According to Lumerians, the EP is one of "lost orphan songs, hand-picked from [a] overwhelmingly vast improvisation archive. The first in a series of radiation burnt offerings."

 

Pre-Order From Hands In The Dark (Starting May 29).

 

If ever there was a gallery that were my soulmate -- or that I would want to be my soulmate, anyway -- it would be San Francisco's Gallery Hijinks. Their opening this Saturday, February 4th, features the works of New York artist Matthew Craven, who painstakingly inks and collages geometric black and white images onto aged paper. His source imagery reads vaguely familiar, perhaps reminiscent of old Roman or Greek ruins paired alongside patterns from the Peruvian Andes or West African baskets? It's anyone's guess after Craven's done synthesizing together historical and cultural elements from across the globe to create his own minimalistic mythologies. (8 IMAGES TOTAL)

 

Netherlands-based photographer Jan Reurink can't get enough of Tibet, and captures Tibetan landscape and everyday life with a dedicated selfless passion. In our brief Q&A with Reurink below, he tells us about the rainbow plethora of reasons he keeps returning to the sacred land.
Tibet - Jan Reurink The prayer flags in this image are wind horses; they are called རླུང་རྟ་ -- or lungta. They serve as an allegory for the human soul, and now ritually used as a symbol of well-being and good fortune in Tibet. Tibet - Jan Reurink The mountain range of Mount Ti Se (གངས་ཏེ་སེའི་རི་རྒྱུད or gangs te se'i ri rgyud/ gangté serigyü). Also called the Kailash Mountain Range.

Shai Kremer's Fallen Empires series shows unbiased images of Israel's decay and destruction, encouraging dialogue via archeological remnants and landscapes....

This black and white for Reigns' "The Diagram" is a classy one. For the single from their upcoming album, The Widow Blades, they expertly bathe the entire video in blacks using minimalistic compositions and heavy strobing. Given the careful planning that no doubt went...

Like many other Seattle residents, I was first introduced to the work of fabric and mixed media artist Mandy Greer at the central branch of the Seattle Public Library. I remember liking her permanent installation, Library Unbound, and making a mental note to check out more of her stuff (which, of course, I completely forgot to do because I didn't write it down), but it wasn't until Greer's 2011 solo show, Honey And Lightening, at Roq La Rue Gallery, that I was moved from appreciation to awe.


mandy greer Honey And Lightening, 2011. Roq La Rue Gallery, Seattle
Artists often describe their ideas as beginning with a seed, but with Greer the analogy is more literal: her work gives the impression of growth, and her compositions wind sinuously across both body and landscape as fractalized coral reefs that gracefully devour everything they come in contact with. Her painstaking craftsmanship involves the weaving and layering of such diverse materials as buttons, pom poms, sequins, beads, plastic trinkets, glitter, mirrors, and family members' hair. She uses "cheap materials" in such absurdly detailed, utterly chaotic excess that they they take on an aura of luminous richness. Her latest subjects involve strong, folkloric figures festooned in elaborate headdresses. They move gracefully through kaleidoscope forests and fields of trailing grass. One gets the sense of being enveloped by an epic fairy tale, but it's one that lacks a definitive plot. Greer draws from a wide spectrum of folk tales, finding inspiration in stories from Greek, Roman and Chinese cultures. "I stumble upon mythology that speaks to the struggle," she explains. There is an inherent delicacy in textile work – one that Greer both embraces and contradicts. In her works, haunting vignettes of half-told stories are littered with crocheted entrails and vines of thick, cloying mud that evoke a sense of elegant foreboding. They deal with a sense of vague narrative that, through abstraction, finds archetype; her installations whisper of timelessness – of a buried, invisible power that runs below the surface of the world that we cavalierly inhabit. At the time of our interview, Greer was still in the process of settling into her home studio, and walking into her workspace was like entering the magical dress up box every child dreams of having. Her studio is filled with giant, color-sorted plastic bins of fascinatingly patterned and textured scraps of fabric. Half of her studio is devoted to an exposed beamed staging ground for installations, and there are so many odds and ends lying around that, for someone with an attention span as short as mine, it's difficult to find a place for the eye to rest. INTERVIEW CONTINUES BELOW mandy greermandy greerHoney And Lightening, 2011. Roq La Rue Gallery, Seattle

Directed by Abdellatif Kechiche Written by Abdellatif Kechiche, Ghalia Lacroix Starring Yahima Torres, Andre Jacobs and Olivier Gourmet Black Venus is a film centered around the life and death of South African woman Sarah Baartman. Nicknamed Hottentot Venus, Baartman was exhibited as a freakshow attraction in 19th century Europe and lived a life that was unbefitting for even the vilest of human creatures. Her "career" began in Britain, where she was a performer wearing tight garments which showed off her enlarged bosoms and buttocks to a relatively poor British audience. The performance soon enraged the British community, however, resulting in much controversy and the show's eventual export into to the homes of the French upper-class. What Black Venus grimly captures is not the glitz and glamour of "show business," but what happens when a naive young woman is misled by the promises of opportunity. The film explores the worst capabilities of human beings and their yearnings to manipulate and take control of others; it addresses multi-tiered issues of race, class, and opportunity and does so with faithfulness to realism, even when realism is uncomfortably atrocious.

If you are looking for films from today, Sunday, the 30th, you can see them here. Below are choice picks for the FINAL week of the San Francisco International Film Festival! Get your butt out there. Full festival details and movie listings here. --- American Teacher If you're an...

If you are looking for films from today, Wednesday, the 27th, you can see them here. Below are choice picks for the remainder of this week! Full festival details and movie listings here. --- Asleep In The Sun This Argentine film evokes the tag words: "metaphysical mystery," "canine-crazed," "soul-deep,"...