There's an episode on Season One of The Mighty Boosh where Vince Noir declares that it's impossible to be unhappy in a poncho. I've yet to test this theory, but I have doubts as to its validity, based on some photos I've seen of Mexico...

I put Portugal. the Man's new album as one of my outside favorites. The Satanic Satanist is a brilliant soul-influenced album that really shows the Portland band is coming into its own. This is the absolutely bizarre video for the track "Do You"...

All bands -- or at least the good ones -- have an album that, in future years, will be judged as the pinnacle of their successes. Some start out strong but never achieve much recognition with their first and second albums. Some build up to a grand finale but crumble right as their greatest album is released. Some are so consistent, with each new album being a fitting reinvention of their sound, that the debate will rage on for years as to which album defines their legacy. Such is the case with Portugal. The Man, whose fanbase is constantly at odds with itself over which album is the band's most important release to date. With their fourth disc, The Satanic Satanist, the debate continues to rage on. From its fantastically elaborate album packaging to its upgrade in record production quality, The Satanic Satanist marks a definitive, significant change in Portugal. The Man's career; it solidly extends the band's sphere of influence into pop, folk, and funk territories.
Listen to "People Say" - DOWNLOAD MP3

The instrumental, post-rock landscape is a bit crowded as of late. But in just three albums, the Chicago/Seattle trio Russian Circles have cemented themselves at the top, and this fact is readily apparent in their fantastic new album, Geneva. Russian Circles have always bounced between the moments that recall sunshine and the moments that recall audio armageddon. The issue up to this point has been how to balance the serene with the surrounding apocalyptic, sludgy tones that tear it all down. Geneva sludges across with "Fathom," and right from the get-go, the now cemented new bassist Brian Cook makes his presence known. Cook is no stranger to the mastery of the low-end, as his previous work with Botch and These Arms Are Snakes would suggest. But "Fathom" chugs along largely to his own beat. Guitarist Mike Sullivan peppers eerie riffs over it all and drummer Dave Turncrantz pounds away majestically. But seemingly, it is Cook who is finally brings it all together.

Last year marked the first year in which we compiled a top five albums of the year, as deemed by nine Redefine staff writers. Remarkably, no albums were doubled up. It proved that Redefine staff writers have diverse tastes, and that their tastes run the...

Indie-prog rock has never actually been particularly "cool." It has never been hip or in style, and it has always attracted a mostly male audience. And you know what makes an indie-prog band even less cool? Naming the first track on your record "3rd Lvl...